Flight Report: G-ISOB ~ 24th May 2017

Posted on by 5WC in Beat, Hot Air Ballooning

After the Beat Hopper – G-ISOB – was launched at Norwich Cathedral I have been trying to come up with somewhere special to take off from for its maiden flight. It seemed somehow wrong to simply fly from my local recreation ground, or the field behind the pub, that I use every time I fly locally. Virgin Balloon Flights fly locally from Henley and their pilot, Mark Shemilt, now owns and flies my old cloudhopper – G-CEGG. I also knew that a couple of supporters of Beat lived in Henley and so, a couple of emails later, I’d arranged to fly alongside Mark, from a launch site right next to the river, my old and new hoppers together. It seemed like a fitting start to life for Beat.

As ballooning is a social sport, even if cloudhoppers aren’t, we’d invited another local hopper pilot to join us. The launch site – The Upper Thames Rowing Club – is literally just upriver from the Leander Club, site of the Royal Regatta, and on the grass next to the banks themselves we set about inflating the balloons. As this was the first time Beat would ever free fly, I took a little bit longer than usual on the preflight checks to make sure everything was correct and present – to the slight annoyance of the others who ended up waiting for me to be ready – but after a handful of photographs the three balloons were ready for a syncronised take-off. Although, annoyingly, my crew gave me a gentle push as I took to the skies and I launched swinging happily back and forth like a child on a swing! Read more

Book Review: Unbearable Lightness by Portia De Rossi

Posted on by 5WC in Book
Unbearable Lightness by Portia de Rossi - Header

With my university psychology reading list having reverted back to its standard “textbook chapters and peer reviewed periodicals”, neither of which are really designed to be read over the morning porridge, I started to hunt for an alternative. How I came to discover Unbearable Lightness, Portia de Rossi’s memoir about her battle with anorexia and the contributing factors of a life under the Hollywood spotlight, I don’t know. I have an idea it was, once again, social media. But please don’t quote me.

I knew nothing about Portia de Rossi before I set about reading it. I couldn’t have described her appearance, told you her biography, or even her real name. It was purely her link to anorexia that drew me in; the same way it drew me in to Tina McGuff’s Seconds to Snap or Todd Tucker’s simplification of The Great Starvation Experiment. The fact she was famous was just context. Read more

Book Review: Seconds To Snap by Tina McGuff

Posted on by 5WC in Book
Seconds To Snap - Tina McGuff - Header

It’s slightlu hard to review a book that is, essentially, somebody’s life story. It’s difficult to dissect the truth or critique the story. A fictional narrative is easy, you can tear it apart, say which bits you liked, disliked, believed or found fanciful but with the truth that’s impossible. You have to ignore how the story moves from A to B. It has to solely rest on the emotion and feelings you draw instead.

Anorexia, strangely, have a competitive edge. I think it his partly because one of the personality traits that is mostly commonly found amongst suffers is perfectionism. You have to be the best and therefore, anything that challenges your idea that you are as good as possible at something needs to be disproved. As a result, suffers will often talk about triggers. How hearing stories about other’s battles with the illness has caused them to relapse, or to push on further. “If they can do it so can I”. Thankfully, that isn’t something that has ever affected me. I have never felt anorexia was a challenge or something to compare. I can read tales of suffers living on nothing but lettuce leaves and not feel bad that I eat more, in the same way I don’t wish I weighed less than I do because Tina McGuff managed to reach 6 stone. Read more