Film Review: Enough Said

I have been waiting to see Enough Said for a very, very long time and yet I have absolutely no explanation as to the reason why. Essentially, it has sat, in an Amazon wish list for months, or even years, waiting patiently for the price to drop. Constantly forgotten but occasionally checked.

And then it appeared, once again out of the blue, with a huge price reduction and so it was time to see if the wait for worth it. And so, I bought it, gave it a chance and am now wondering why it’s quietly sat in the back of my life for so long? It’s been such a wait, the honestly I’d forgotten what it was about, or why I was attracted to it in the first place, and where as normally I’d rewatch a trailer, reacquaint myself with its appeal, after such a long layoff, such loyalty is our relationship, it seemed to make more sense to just go in blind and believe in trust.

enough-said-michaela-watkins-julia-louis-dreyfus-catherine-keener

However , trust can be misplaced. Because right now I have absolutely no idea what attached to me this film. Nothing happens. It’s not a bad film, it’s not the type of film that will leave you shocked by how unapologetically poor it is, and it’s far, far from being a good film. Enough Said, simply, is a middle of the road, forgetful malaise. It’s the background noise at a party, or the grass growing in your garden, serving no purpose to the fulfilment of your life other than a bit of window dressing.

My first real problem is with the story. Yes, it has one. But it’s cliched. Outlining it would be to give away the entire film, but then sadly, having just watched the trailer posthumously so to speak, it does that for you. But the trailer creates a warmth and charm to the film that is sadly lacking when stretched out to feature length. Instead of a fun and humorous tale, Enough Said just falls coldly and without explanation from scene to scene. Repetitively moaning as it goes.

And you could forgive it a very basic, predictable and linear plot if the characters were likeable and interesting, but once again they are not. They won’t distract you, or repulse you from the boring plot, but they won’t excite you either. They are just people, stuck in a story that is very flat. They have no depth and there is no interest into looking further at them from team bringing this tale to life. You never feel like you really know them. There are no back stories, no motives, no interests. And no sense you will ever be presented with that.

Enough Said - Julia Louis-Dreyfus & James Gandolfini

Everything about Enough Said just reminded me of somebody trying to recount a story to a group of strangers. There is a real sense of throw away monotony and shallowness that comes from somebody trying to bring to life an overview of events rather that really draw you in and emotionally connect you to the story.

And that emptiness is highlighted by the acting of the main characters Eva and Albert – played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus and James Gandolfini – both who have proven talents and careers blossomed from the small screen and yet together they just don’t feel compatible. There is no chemistry, warmth, or connection. It’s not a sense of incompatibility in it’s fullest destructive force, but rather nothing more than just a sense of friendship. Of platonic acceptance. Everything just feels a little forced, put on, faked. They look like actors, acting at a relationship.

The rest of the cast do bring some interest, but are simply to supportive and removed to really have any impact and Catherine Keener, who as the third leg of the triangle, and once again with a proven track record, could potentially inject the life that is so sadly missing, is asked to play nothing more than a flowery hippy, doing so brilliantly, but removing any chance of salvation the film desperately needs.

Enough Said - Julia Louis-Dreyfus & Catherine Keener

Enough Said has walked open arms into the stereotypical failings of hundreds and thousands of romantic comedies. It’s created an unbelievable world full of unexplained characters telling a simplistically portrayed story of silly love. And aiming it towards a maturing audience rather than the teen market, it just heightens this sense of genre conformity in a way that leaves you nonplussed to the end result. There is nothing to like about Enough Said, but equally, there is nothing to dislike either. It’ll just wash past you with a quick “hi, how are you? before quickly adding “would love to chat but can’t stop”.

5 out of 10 stars (5 / 10)

Posted on by 5WC in Film First Edition

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